Key Program Features

  • First-in-class α9α10 nAChR antagonist
  • Non-opioid: non-addictive and non-tolerizing chronic pain therapy
  • Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects
  • Well tolerated with no observed toxicities in chronic studies

KCP-400 for Chronic Pain

Drug Development Phase: Pre-clinical

Chronic pain is one of the largest and most widely-acknowledged unmet medical needs in the world. Current therapies like opioids, anti-epileptics and NSAIDs can be minimally effective and have the potential to cause dependence, are susceptible to tolerance or have intolerable side effects. There are 259 million opioid prescriptions written every year and ~50 people die every day from prescription opioid overdose in the US1.

KCP-400 is a first in class α9α10 nAChR antagonist with a novel mechanism of action. It is a highly potent synthetic peptide that is derived from the venom of a cone snail. KCP-400 is a non-opioid that has demonstrated robust analgesic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects across multiple preclinical chronic pain models. It was well tolerated with no observed toxicities in short-term studies. Key differentiation points include:

  • Peripherally acting which may minimize adverse events; non-addictive and non-tolerizing
  • Demonstrated neuroprotective effects which prevent neurodegeneration and may slow the progression of pain following injury

By limiting pain-signals and inflammation in a non-addictive way, KCP-400 potentially reduces pain, without risking chemical dependency. These factors provide a competitive advantage for KCP-400 over the current standard of care and other products in development.

Preclinical studies suggest that KCP-400 may be an effective treatment for most types of Chronic Pain including diabetic neuropathy, lower back pain and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The global market for pain management pharmaceuticals and devices is projected to grow to ~$44.3B by 20202.

References:
1. CDC "Number and Age-Adjusted Rates of Drug-poisoning Deaths Involving Opioid Analgesics and Heroin" 2015
2. Research and Markets "The Global Market for Pain Management Drugs and Devices 2015";